Cerebral Palsy

What is Cerebral Palsy?

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a term used to describe a group of chronic conditions affecting body movement and muscle coordination. It is caused by damage to one or more specific areas of the brain, usually occurring during fetal development, before, during or shortly after birth or during infancy. Children with CP may have a combination of the following problems depending on the severity of the brain damage: delayed milestones, difficulty in posture and movement, muscle tightness or spasm, involuntary movement, impaired hand functions, impairment of sight, hearing or speech; seizures and mental retardation. Although the brain damage is non-progressive, if left without intervention, the degree of disability faced by the child will increase as the child grows. All CP children need some rehabilitation to help them to lead as normal a life within the limits of their condition.


What are the symptoms of Cerebral Palsy?

The most important and early symptoms of cerebral palsy include:

  • Delay in milestones, motor and social, if the child doesn't attain head control or doesn't roll over in time, it may be due to cerebral palsy; please consult your pediatrician.
  • Incessant cry, which usually starts from the newborn period.
  • Lethargy - a baby who sleeps most of the time and doesn't bother the parents, may have cerebral palsy.
  • Increased body stiffness - if your baby feels very heavy and his/her limbs are not supple, that would be indicative of hypertonia, which could be a sign of cerebral palsy.


What should I do if my child has cerebral palsy?

The most important thing is when and how you start treatment. Early intervention has been found to reduce the extent of the motor handicap and improve the functional outcome of these children. Early sensory stimulation - visual, auditory and tactile can significantly lower the functional problems. If your child has any developmental delay, he/she should be enrolled into an early infant stimulation and intervention program in a good organization.

Instead of a single person's attention, the child needs the combined attention of a team of professionals such as development pediatrician/pediatric neurologist, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist, orthotist, orthopedic, audiologist, and ophthalmologist.


If you think your child has Cerebral Palsy, contact us as soon as possible to schedule an appointment.


Importance of Early Intervention Program

The early intervention program is designed to stimulate development in the areas of language, fine motor, social, emotional growth, is most rapid from birth to 3 years of age and early intervention is essential for children with developmental delays.

The most important thing is when and how you start treatment. Early intervention has been found to reduce the extent of the motor handicap and improve the functional outcome of these children.

Early sensory stimulation - visual, auditory and tactile can significantly lower the functional problems. If your child has any developmental delay, he/she should be enrolled into an early infant stimulation and intervention program in a good organization.

Instead of a single person's attention, the child needs the combined attention of a team of professionals like the development pediatrician/pediatric neurologist, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist, orthotist, orthopedic, audiologist, and ophthalmologist.